Geography of Northern Mariana Islands – The Ultimate Free Guide 2021

Learn facts and Geography of Northern Mariana Islands including Major Geographical Features, Natural resources, Region, area, Capital, Border countries, rivers in Northern Mariana Islands .

  • The Mariana Islands are a crescent-shaped archipelago comprising the summits of fifteen mostly dormant volcanic mountains in the western North Pacific Ocean, between the 12th and 21st parallels north and along the 145th meridian east. They lie south-southeast of Japan, west-southwest of Hawaii, north of New Guinea and east of the Philippines, demarcating the Philippine Sea’s eastern limit.
  • They are found in the northern part of the western Oceanic sub-region of Micronesia, and are politically divided into two jurisdictions of the United States: the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and, at the southern end of the chain, the territory of Guam.
  • The islands were named after the influential Spanish queen Mariana of Austria following their colonization in the 17th century.

Geography of Northern Mariana Islands

Geography of Northern Mariana Islands
Figure; Wikipedia

Geography of Northern Mariana Islands

  • The Mariana Islands are the southern part of a submerged mountain range that extends 1,565 miles (2,519 km) from Guam to near Japan. Geographically, the Marianas are part of a larger region called Micronesia, situated between 13° and 21°N latitude and 144° and 146°E longitude.

Realm:

Oceanian

Area:

1,036 km2

Capital:

Saipan

Population:

57,557

Bordering Countries:

The Northern Mariana Islands share a maritime border with Japan.

Total Size:

400 sq mi

Geographical Coordinates:

15.0979° N, 145.6739° E

World Region or Continent:

Oceania

General Terrain:

The Northern Mariana Islands, together with Guam to the south, compose the Mariana Islands. The southern islands are limestone, with level terraces and fringing coral reefs. The northern islands are volcanic, with active volcanoes on Anatahan, Pagan and Agrihan.

Country:

United States

Conservation status:

Critical/Endangered

Climate:

  • The islands have a tropical marine climate moderated by seasonal northeast trade winds.
  • There is little seasonal temperature variation.
  • The dry season runs from December to June, and the rainy season from July to November and can include typhoons.

Major cities:

  • Saipan
  • San Jose
  • Pagan Village
  • Agrihan Village
  • Alamagan Village

Major Land forms:

The Northern Mariana Islands, together with Guam to the south, compose the Mariana Islands. The southern islands are limestone, with level terraces and fringing coral reefs. The northern islands are volcanic, with active volcanoes on Anatahan, Pagan and Agrihan

Highest elevation:

Mount Agrihan

Major Rivers and Lakes:

  • Lake Susupe
  • lake stage
  • Laguna Sanhalom (Inner Lake) Pagan (island)
  • Laguna Sanhiyon (also Laguna Lake) Pagan (island)
  • Lake Hagoi Tinian

Natural Resources:

The primary natural resource is fish, some of which are endangered species, which leads to conflict.

Major Geographical Features:

Biomes & Ecosystems:

Tropical and subtropical dry broadleaf forests

Topography:

The southern islands are limestone, with level terraces and fringing coral reefs. The northern islands are volcanic, with active volcanoes on Anatahan, Pagan and Agrihan. The volcano on Agrihan has the highest elevation at 3,166 feet (965 m). About one-fifth of the land is arable; another tenth is pasture.

Oceans:

The western Pacific Ocean

Islands:

  • Saipan
  • Tinian
  • Rota Island
  • Anatahan
  • Farallon De Pajaros
  • Alamagan
  • Guguan
  • Farallon De Medinilla
  • Aguijan
  • Pagan Island
  • Sarigan
  • Asuncion Island

Mountain Ranges:

Mount Tapochau
Agrihan
Guguan
Anatahan
Sarigan
Asuncion Island
Farallon De Pajaros
Zealandia Bank
Mount Lam Lam
Supply Reef

See Also:

World Map

References:

Wikipedia

Naveed Tawargeri
 

Hi, I'm Naveed Tawargeri, and I'm the owner and creator of this blog. I'm a Software Developer with a passion for Programming. 

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